Public Policy

Policy Statements

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Policy Statement on 
Occupational Ergonomics for Industry 4.0

 

Human Factors & Ergonomic workplace analysis and design are well proven methods for reducing occupational injuries and illnesses in the workplace, [3,9] and provide substantial benefits for reducing costs and improving operational efficiencies and productivity [8,18,21]. Balancing the cognitive and physical demands of work with the capacity of the worker optimizes productivity, quality of work and worker wellbeing, all of which contribute to healthy organizations and economies. Emerging Industry 4.0 technologies provide a substantial opportunity for improving the quality and effectiveness of ergonomics efforts, creating both improved worker safety and industry cost savings.

Download a PDF of the entire policy statement here.
 


Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Policy Statement
on Artificial Intelligence in Health Care

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being proposed as a tool to aid health care professionals in detecting, diagnosing, treating and monitoring illnesses, as well as for examining large datasets of biological data for medical research at the cellular and genetic level. Further there is a confluence of AI with wearable and sensing technologies that can generate very large datasets from the general population, allowing for new forms of bio-monitoring and direct delivery of AI-generated diagnoses or health alerts to both clinicians and patients.

Download a PDF of the entire policy statement here.
 


Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Policy Statement
on Airline Seating

Outdated FAA data regarding passengers’ size and weight place air passengers at risk with regard to safety, health and comfort. HFES endorses a number of changes to airline  seating based on the considerable human factors scientific data relevant to this subject.

Download a PDF of the entire policy statement here.


Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Policy Statement
on Autonomous and Semiautonomous Vehicles

Semiautonomous and highly autonomous vehicles have the potential to enhance the safety and efficiency of the American transportation system. However, automated driving technologies significantly affect human performance, potentially negating those benefits, and should be designed and tested to address human performance issues before being introduced onto public roads. The human performance issues that automated driving technologies could introduce include loss of driver engagement and low situation awareness,[1-3] poor understanding of and overreliance on automated systems,[4-6] and loss of manual skills needed for performance and decision-making.[7, 8]

Download a PDF of the entire policy statement here.
 


Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Policy Statement
on Human Systems Integration

The goal of Human Systems Integration (HSI) is “to optimize total system performance and total ownership costs, while ensuring that the system is designed, operated, and maintained to effectively provide the user with the ability to complete their mission”[1]. HSI is an “umbrella” discipline and management approach that orchestrates the efforts of selected people-related disciplines; seeks to optimize the integration of humans with complex systems; maximizes the performance of system-related humans during system operation, maintenance and support; and, minimizes customer life-cycle costs related to personnel (e.g., acquisition, healthcare, safety, education and training, berthing, compensation, moving, and personnel management). HSI reduces total system costs as well the potential for costly accidents [2, 7].

Download a PDF of the entire policy statement here.
 


Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Position on AV START Act [S.1885] 

The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) opposes the proposed AV START Act [S.1885] being considered by the US Senate.  Please select the link below to read the Society's concerns about the bill.

Download a PDF of the entire position statement here.