PROGRAM BACKGROUND

Title of program

Human Factors (MS, PhD) with 8 specialized courses in HF

Year human factors/ergonomics program was established

1978

Accredited by HFES?

Yes

Contact person for more information, including applications

Bryan E. Porter, Professor & Ph.D. Programs Director, Department of Psychology, MGB 250, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0267; 757-683-4458; bporter@odu.edu

Catalog (free)

http://www.odu.edu/psychology

Academic calendar

Semester

Human factors/ergonomics graduate degrees offered

MS and PhD

Goals, objectives, and emphasis of the program

This program follows the scientist-practitioner model with emphasis on psychological theory and behavioral science, fundamental and innovative areas of human factors/engineering psychology, statistics and research methodology, understanding the broader organizational context for practicing human factors/engineering psychology, and practical experience. Students are encouraged to make innovative professional contributions. Performance expectations and standards are high. The organizational climate of the program is open, nurturing, and cooperative. Students play an active part in the governance of the program and are encouraged to be active in the local chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

Number of degrees granted during last 3 years

PhD 4

Can students attend part-time?

No

Are required courses offered through distance learning?

No

Are required courses at night?

Yes

Are required courses offered during summer?

Yes

Does the univeristy have an HFES student chapter?

Yes


 

APPLICATION PROCESS

Application deadline

January 5

Application fee

$50


 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Minimum requirements

GPA: 3.0+

GRE: 153 v, 144 q (new GRE scoring) 

Other: GRE advanced test in psychology. Note: GRE advanced test is required only for applicants without a bachelor's degree in psychology.

For international students, minimum TOEFL score of 550 if paper-based or minimum TOEFL IBT of 79. Coursework in statistics, experimental methods, and 9 additional semester hours in psychology.

Importance of other criteria as admission factors

Research: high

Work experience: low

Letters: medium

Interview: medium

Tuition and fees

Resident: $393/semester hour

Nonresident: $997/semester hour


 

ADMISSIONS

Number of students applying to the human factors/ergonomics
program last year

23

Number of students accepted into the program last year

6

Number of students entering the program last year

1 (yearly avg. 3)

Anticipated number of openings per year for the next two years

4–5


 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Percentage of students in program receiving financial assistance

100%

Amount received per year (minimum – typical – maximum)

$15,000 – $18,000 – $20,000 

Types of assistance available

Fellowships, TA, RA, scholarship, most tuition exempt 

When should students apply for financial assistance?

With application


 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Graduate degrees offered

MS and PhD

Number of units required

MS: 36

PhD: 48 post Master's

Exams required

MS: oral defense exam

PhD: qualifying exam, oral defense of dissertation

Language requirements

None

Research required

MS: thesis and first-year project research required

PhD: dissertation research required

Practical experience required

MS: none

PhD: one semester to one year internship/practical experience

Typical number of years required to obtain degree

MS: 2

PhD: 3

Is there a non-thesis option?

No


 

CURRICULUM

Required courses (units)

MS required courses: Quantitative Methods (ANOVA and Regression, 8), Perception (3), Cognition (3), Research Methods (2), Development or Advanced Social (3) 

MS/PhD Human Factors Major Courses: Human Computer Interface Design (3), Ergonomics (3), Advanced Ergonomics (3), Human Factors Psychology (3), Methods, Measures, Techniques and Tools in Human Factors (3), Attention and Human Performance (3) 

Electives (units)

MS/PhD Human Factors Elective Courses:
Advanced Physiological (3), Personnel (3), Organizational (3), Advanced Cognition and Information Processing (3), Multilevel Models: HLM (3), Quasi-Experimental Methods (3), Psychometric Theory (3), Structural Equation Modeling (3), Various Topics (3 each; e.g., Aviation, Perception in Real and Virtual Environments, Advanced Human Factors). In addition, while an elective at-large, Teaching of Psychology (3) is required to be a teacher of record for a course. HF students are strongly encouraged to obtain teaching experience. 

Number of courses outside department that are required

None

Number of courses outside department that are recommended

Depends on student's interests

Average or typical class size in a required course

5–7

Modeling and Simulation HF Certificate

An optional curriculum with prescribed coursework from the ODU Modeling and Simulation Department. A research project involving modeling and simulation is also required. Specific requirements can be obtained by emailing the Programs Director (Dr. Bryan Porter, bporter@odu.edu). 


 

RESEARCH/TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES

Research and support facilities available to students in the program: 

Lab facilities are available for research in modeling and simulation, human perception, performance, cognition, and psychophysiology. Facilities include microcomputers, local area networked testing stations, sound-attenuated testing chambers, driving simulation equipment, marksmanship training simulator, brain-computer interface equipment, vection stimulation equipment, game-based virtual environment equipment, and EEG and ERP recording equipment. Access to university computing and multimedia development facilities is also available. To complement the program's developing emphasis on modeling and simulation, students also have access to the Virginia Modeling and Simulation Center (VMASC). VMASC is an ODU-affiliated research and development center where scientists from a number of disciplines create and test computer models and simulation applications to benefit industrial, academic, and governmental interests. 

Teaching opportunities available to students in the program:
All graduate students are encouraged to teach their own course of record for at least one semester before graduation. Students typically teach undergraduate courses in their area of interest. Students may teach more often if they desire. The Teaching of Psychology course (listed in the electives) is required of students who teach their own course of record. However, nearly all students will obtain experience as a Teaching Assistant as part of their funding, regardless of their later interest in teaching their own course of record.  

Current research activities and projects being carried out by program faculty and/or students:

Human-computer interaction, visual and auditory display design, auditory localization, virtual audio displays, vigilance and attention, team decision making and training, use of advanced automation, design and development of modeling and simulation technology, measurement and impact of forms of computer usage on productivity, and human cognition and performance.


 

STUDENT STATISTICS

Current number of active students in program, by gender

8 men, 8 women

Current number of first-year students
in program

1 in 2013 (avg. 3) 

Based on current graduate students in the program, the mean score on admission tests and undergraduate GPA by degree being sought are

GRE 158 v, 149 q, 5.0 a, GPA 3.58


 

FACULTY

Ivan Ash, PhD 2005, U. Illinois-Chicago, heuristic formation and use, biases, expertise 

James P. Bliss, PhD 1993, U. Central Florida; alarm mistrust, training, virtual environments and simulation  

J. Christopher Brill, PhD 2007, U. Central Florida; multimodal displays, tactile sensation and perception, spatial audio displays, simulator sickness, sopite syndrome 

Donald D. Davis, PhD 1982, Michigan State U.; macroergonomics, management of technological innovation, engineering management

Poornima Madhavan, PhD 2005, U. Illinois; decision making under risk, time pressure and uncertainty, simulation, automation

Mark W. Scerbo, PhD 1987, U. Cincinnati; cognition, perception, human-computer interaction, VR and simulation

[Updated November 2013]