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Information for Students

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO, STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
Buffalo, New York
Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering

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BACKGROUND:
Title: Human Factors Engineering (MS, PhD)
Est: 1963
Accreditation: HFES
Semester
Granted last 3 years: MS 12, PhD 4
Part-time: yes
Distance learning available: yes
HFES student chapter: yes
Program: A strong research and application environment is promoted in which faculty and students maintain close working relationships. Emphasis is placed on advancing the student's knowledge base and research skills and encouraging students to pursue their own research interests. The program draws from a large number of areas, including engineering, rehabilitation science, mathematics, psychology, physiology, and computer science. Current areas of interest include cognitive engineering, modeling and supporting human decision making, workplace ergonomics, and universal design.
Contact: Victor Paquet, Director of Graduate Studies, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, 438 Bell Hall, Amherst, NY 14260; 716/645-4712; vpaquet@eng.buffalo.edu.
Catalog: (free), Graduate Admissions, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, 438 Bell Hall, Amherst, NY 14260

APPLICATION:
Deadlines: fellowships and assistantships 4/2 (fall), general admission 10/3 (fall)
Fee: $50

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
GPA: 3.0
GRE: 1200 v + q
Other: BS or equivalent degree required. Three semesters of calculus, a two-semester probability/statistics sequence, and one course in computer programming or equivalent experience highly recommended.
Research: medium
Work experience: medium
Letters: high
Interview: low

ADMISSIONS:
Students applying last year: 26
Accepted: 13
Entered program: 8
Openings/year: 10

TUITION AND FEES:
Resident: $4500/semester
Nonresident: $7500/semester

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE:
% receiving: 60
Amount: $11500/$16000/$21000
Available: fellowship, TA, RA, scholarship, all tuition exempt
Apply: with application

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS:
MS: 30 units, thesis defense or written exam, no languages or practical experience required, thesis or equivalent research experience required, 2 years
Nonthesis option: yes
PhD: 72 units, comprehensive exam, advanced (research) exam, proposal defense, dissertation defense, dissertation research, no languages or practical experience required, 4 years

CURRICULUM:
Required courses: Human Factors Research Methods (3), Design and Analysis of Experiments (3)
Electives: Human Information Processing (3), Human-Computer Interaction (3), Physiological Foundations of Human Factors (3), Occupational System Safety (3), Sociotechnical Systems (3), Cognitive Engineering (3), Occupational Ergonomics and Biomechanics (3), Work Analysis (3), Musculoskelatal Epidemiology (3)
Required courses outside department: 0
Recommended courses outside department: 0
Offered: night
Distance learning: Design and Analysis of Experiments (internet, video), Occupational and Systems Safety (internet, video), Human Computer Interaction (internet, video)
Class size: 15

RESEARCH/TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES:
Research facilities: The Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering has numerous computer facilities and research labs available to support graduate student education in human factors, including a human-computer experimentation lab equipped with networked computers and printers, a multisource information fusion laboratory equipped with computers and SUN workstations, a visual performance laboratory with equipment for video data capture and analysis, two fully equipped biomechanics laboratories, and various equipment measuring human performance for ergonomics field studies. Facilities for experimentation in work physiology and biomechanics include EMG, force measurement, motion capture, video monitoring equipment, electronic goniometers, biomechanical analysis software, and electronic anthropometric measurement equipment. Numerous small laboratories are configured as needed for individual student research space.
Teaching: Supervised teaching assistantships are available for qualified students, including grading, laboratory, and recitation responsibilities. Advanced PhD students may have the opportunity to serve as course lecturers.
Current research: Human factors in medical systems, human performance in complex decision making, graphical displays of uncertain information, new methods in anthropometry, biomechanics for injury prevention, and applied ergonomics intervention research.

STUDENT STATISTICS:
Active: 15 men, 10 women
First-year students: 8
Mean first-year scores: GRE 500 v, 750 q, 680 a

FACULTY:
Ann Bisantz, PhD 1997, Georgia Tech; cognitive engineering, human-machine systems, human decision making
Colin G. Drury, (Emeritus) PhD 1968, U Birmingham; human reliability and systems safety, human factors in quality assurance
Victor Paquet, ScD 1998, U Massachusetts at Lowell; ergonomics, occupational safety and health, musculoskeletal epidemiology
Gwanseob Shin, PhD 2005, North Carolina State U; occupational biomechanics, physical ergonomics, ergonomics job intervention, forensic biomechanics
Changxu Wu, PhD 2007, U Michigan; computational modeling of human performance and workload, transportation and airport safety, neuroergonomics, human factors in manufacturing and medical systems

[Updated March 2011]