Skip Navigation

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

 
Home
Login
About HFES
Newsroom
Membership
HFES Bulletin
Technical Groups
Chapters
Publications
Standards
Public Policy Matters
HFES Meetings
Awards and Fellows
Educational Resources
Webinars
National Ergonomics Month
Information for Students
Job Placement Service
Directory of Consultants
Calendar
Links of Interest
Advertise with HFES
Jupiter Images

Search

 

About Search

HFES News and Bulletin

Human Factors Researchers Test Voting Systems for Seniors That Can Improve Accuracy and Speed for Voters of All Ages
Thursday, December 20, 2007

SANTA MONICA, CA – Human factors researchers at Florida State University have identified ways to improve electronic voting accuracy among older voters while also shortening waiting time at the polls. The results of their study were published in the fall 2007 issue of Ergonomics in Design.

During the 2000 presidential election in Palm Beach County, Florida, voting machines and ballot formats came under national scrutiny after it was found that more than 29,000 ballots were spoiled. The use of punchcard machines and a confusing ballot layout caused some voters to select an unintended candidate or double-punch the ballot. In 2004 in Ohio, the issue of time at the polls became a critical factor; despite the use of electronic voting machines, a confusing ballot layout and an insufficient number of machines caused long waiting lines and prevented some Ohioans from voting.

These problems led Tiffany Jastrzembski and Neil Charness to test ballot and machine usability with a particular focus on older voters, who – because of reduced vision and motor control – tend to have more problems using computers, especially under time pressure. These researchers adopted a gerontological approach, which implies that when systems are made easier for older people to use, performance among younger users also improves.

The researchers tested voting performance with 30 younger (18–26 years old) and 30 older (ages 64–77) study participants using four ballot layouts and machine designs: (a) touchscreen and full ballot on one screen, (b) touchscreen and one ballot per screen, (c) touchscreen plus keypad and full ballot on one screen, and (d) touchscreen plus keypad and one ballot per screen.

The pure touchscreen format with one ballot per screen was found to produce the most accurate results, but the pure touchscreen with full ballot on a single screen showed the fastest completion times. As is often the case with human-machine interfaces, there is a trade-off between accuracy and speed. Even a small percentage of errors could potentially result in hundreds of thousands of miscast ballots, which must be weighed against the need to reduce waiting times at the polls.

Jastrzembski and Charness recommend additional studies – again with older voters – that can lead to more user-friendly ballot design and electronic voting systems for users of all ages.

Download a copy of the Ergonomics in Design article, “What Older Adults Can Teach Us About Designing Better Ballots” (993 kb). For more information, contact HFES Communications Director Lois Smith.

 

                                       *          *          *

 

The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in September 2007, is a multidisciplinary professional association of more than 4,700 persons in the United States and throughout the world. Its members include psychologists and other scientists, designers, and engineers, all of whom have a common interest in designing systems and equipment to be safe and effective for the people who operate and maintain them. HFES is the largest human factors/ergonomics organization affiliated with the International Ergonomics Association.

Photo credit: Joseph Steiner watches a demonstration of a touchscreen voting machine during a voter education program on May 26, 2004, in Miami, Florida. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

More News
Home